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Dangerous Bedfellows

I opened an innocuous-looking email here at the Lilith office last week and found we had been cordially invited to the 2nd Annual Israel/Washington DC Summit sponsored by Christians United… Read more »

Women and Dough

“For three transgressions women die in childbirth: for being careless regarding [the laws of] menstruation, the tithe from dough, and kindling the [Sabbath and festival] light.”– Bameh Madlikin / Mishnah… Read more »

Legislating Fairness

I’d like to take a moment to talk about American law, and race, and we the (Jewish) people. It came up when the Supreme Court decided that Brown v. The… Read more »

The Anti-Feminist Diet?

As a sustainably-conscious foodie, I’ve recently come across a lot of press about “The Localvore Challenge”. The basic gist of the challenge is: wherever you live, attempt to only eat… Read more »

Responding to Rape in Darfur

To state it crudely, rape is the “trademark” of the current genocide in Darfur, the western region of Sudan. Genocide historians have remarked that although sexual violence has been a… Read more »

Be a part of the story

It seems implausible that we have to now put z"l after Iris Apfel's name...may her memory be a blessing for those who knew her.

Revisit Yona Zeldis McDonough's "Ode to Iris Apfel," linked in our bio. 

"Allow me to digress: Jews and fabric go together like, well, bagels and lox. In Europe many Jews sold fabrics, or were tailors and rag peddlers—while in this country, Jews have been integrally connected to the garment industry, both in New York City, and in cities elsewhere, like Dallas, for decades."

It seems implausible that we have to now put z"l after Iris Apfel`s name...may her memory be a blessing for those who knew her.

Revisit Yona Zeldis McDonough`s "Ode to Iris Apfel," linked in our bio.

"Allow me to digress: Jews and fabric go together like, well, bagels and lox. In Europe many Jews sold fabrics, or were tailors and rag peddlers—while in this country, Jews have been integrally connected to the garment industry, both in New York City, and in cities elsewhere, like Dallas, for decades."
...

"I think of it as seychel, a kind of seasoned wisdom, and now that my mother is no longer alive I have despaired of acquiring it." 

Read Bonnie Friedman's brilliant essay "The Treasure My Mother Couldn't Bestow," from Lilith's Winter 2024 issue now. Live on Lilith.org and in our bio. 

Art courtesy of Natalia Zourabova.

"I think of it as seychel, a kind of seasoned wisdom, and now that my mother is no longer alive I have despaired of acquiring it."

Read Bonnie Friedman`s brilliant essay "The Treasure My Mother Couldn`t Bestow," from Lilith`s Winter 2024 issue now. Live on Lilith.org and in our bio.

Art courtesy of Natalia Zourabova.
...

"If you enjoy light reading, a clear narrative arc, and action driven plot, this book might be a challenging read. However, if you like the “roaming freedom” of reading short, independent chapters that explore a myriad of complexities about what it means to be a (Jewish) woman who sees herself as “a pacifist, feminist, un-tamed, non-mainstream, different, and difficult,” you will find a worthy companion (or “comrade” as Wisenberg would say) who does not shy away from challenging conventions and assumptions." 

Read Nina Lichenstein's review of S.L. Wisenberg's "The Wandering Womb" essay collection, from our Winter 2024 issue. 📚 Link in bio.

"If you enjoy light reading, a clear narrative arc, and action driven plot, this book might be a challenging read. However, if you like the “roaming freedom” of reading short, independent chapters that explore a myriad of complexities about what it means to be a (Jewish) woman who sees herself as “a pacifist, feminist, un-tamed, non-mainstream, different, and difficult,” you will find a worthy companion (or “comrade” as Wisenberg would say) who does not shy away from challenging conventions and assumptions."

Read Nina Lichenstein`s review of S.L. Wisenberg`s "The Wandering Womb" essay collection, from our Winter 2024 issue. 📚 Link in bio.
...

shabbat shalom, y'all 🌸

shabbat shalom, y`all 🌸 ...

Turning to Hiba Abu Nada's poem, "I Grant You Refuge," right now. 

Hiba Abu Nada, Palestinian poet and novelist in Gaza, wrote this on October 10th (translated by Huda Fakhreddine in Protean Magazine). The poet was killed in an Israeli airstrike on October 20th. This excerpt is a part of "Our World After Oct. 7th" in Lilith's Winter 2023-2024 Issue.

Turning to Hiba Abu Nada`s poem, "I Grant You Refuge," right now.

Hiba Abu Nada, Palestinian poet and novelist in Gaza, wrote this on October 10th (translated by Huda Fakhreddine in Protean Magazine). The poet was killed in an Israeli airstrike on October 20th. This excerpt is a part of "Our World After Oct. 7th" in Lilith`s Winter 2023-2024 Issue.
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