The Lilith calendar—upcoming events of Jewish feminist interest we think you should know about. Know of an event you’d like to see listed here? Send us an email.


FEBRUARY

Love Songs from the Middle East
A Valentine’s Day Extravaganza will be taking place at the Library of Congress with poems from the Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish. The event will be held in the African and Middle Eastern Reading Room in the Thomas Jefferson Building on the 2nd floor. For more information, e-mail Ann Brener (abrener@loc.gov) or Hirad Dinavari (hdin@loc.gov).
February 16, 12 noon-1 PM

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Memory Transferred:Voices from the Descendants of Destruction and Displacement
Several young writers, including descendants of Holocaust survivors, will be exploring how Holocaust-related texts differ from and relate to other written works have been shaped by atrocities and family history. These writers will share their own experiences in grappling with cultural trauma and in discovering their motivations for storytelling.
February 9, 7 PM
Learn more here

JANUARY

Writers Resist: #LouderTogether for Free Expression
Stand with PEN America to defend free expression, reject hate crimes and uphold truth in the face of lies and misinformation. This literary protest will take place on the steps of the New York Public Library’s Schwarzman Building at 42nd St. PEN America will be bringing together hundreds of writers and artists along with thousands of New Yorkers on the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. American poet laureates Robert Pinsky, Author and Rita Dove will each offer hope and inspiration with “inaugural” poem.
January 15, 2-4 PM

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Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the Yeshiva University Museum Collection
Join curator Bonni-Dara Michaels for a tour of YUM’s newest exhibition featuring garments, textiles and jewelry spanning three centuries. Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a pearl and silver embroidered lectern cover of a Chief Rabbi of Izmir, a custom-made 1950 Hattie Carnegie wedding gown and a 1969 Ark curtain made by Ina Golub for Temple Beth Ahm in New Jersey.
Tickets: Free; Reservation Required
January 18, 6:30 PM
Learn more here 

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What Does Jewish Look Like to You? An Evening of Monologues Highlighting Jewish Racial & Ethnic Diversity Featuring Vanessa Hidary and Kaleidoscope
Storytelling and Slam Poetry! Through extensively crafted, deeply personal storytelling and slam poetry, Kaleidoscope interrogates the ever-popular question: “What does Jewish look like?” Boldly diverse, distinctly Jewish and talented, Kaleidoscope includes performers of Jamaican, Ethiopian, Moroccan, Yemenite, Libyan and African-American Jewish background. Presented by the American Jewish Historical Society.
Tickets: $10 general; $5 AJHS members, seniors, students; $12 at the door
January 1
9, 7 PM
Learn more here

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Heroine of a Thousand Pieces: The Judith Mosaics of Lilian Broca
The Museum of Biblical Art welcomes the Consul General of Canada, Mrs. Sara Wilshaw, who will be giving the opening remarks at Lilian Broca’s exhibition reception. Scott Peck, the director and curator, and Jamie Pink Weisbrod of the Mosaic Institute will be hosting the opening reception on Sunday, January 22nd. The artist will be in attendance, and there will be kosher refreshments and live jazz music. The exhibit talk, From Pebbles to Pixels: The Importance and Evolution of Style, will be presented by Dr. Sheila Campbell and Lilian Broca on Tuesday January 24th.
January 22, 3-5 PM-January 24, 5:30 PM

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Bezalel Academy of Jerusalem Presents “A Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes”
Walk of Art: Visionary Shoes is an exclusive exhibition that explores the art and cult-following of women’s shoes. The exhibition will feature more than 60 contemporary designs created by distinguished alumni and students of the Israel-based academy.
January 24-February 13
Learn more here

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“Will You Hear My Voice?” Rachel Bluwstein: Hebrew Poetess and Pioneer
This presentation on Rachel Bluwstein (1899-1931) will be led by Ann Brenner, the Hebraic Area Specialist at the Library of Congress. A gifting of a signed copy of Rachel’s iconic second book to the Hebraic Section, as well as a display of rare books relating to Rachel’s life and poetry, will follow the presentation. The presentation will take place in the African and Middle Eastern Reading Room on the 2nd floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.
January 26, 12PM-1PM

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“Golgotha” by Shmuel Rafael, Performed by Victor Attar
Coinciding with World Holocaust Day, La Mama presents “Golgotha.” The production reveals, with a blend of acting, video and music, the under-recognized experience of Ladino-speaking Sephardic Jews who were sent to Auschwitz Birkenau.
January 26-January 29
Learn more here

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Feminist Futures at The New York Academy
From designer babies to genetic surveillance, and from the “culture” of tech workplaces to the politics of climate change, feminist science studies writers are at the forefront of research on some of the most pressing issues in science and technology today. Together they force us to consider whether new technologies—such as those in medicine and computing—will deliver on their promise to make the world a safer, happier, and more prosperous place for everyone, or will instead reinforce the systemic social exclusion of particular social groups. This course will delve into some of the apparent dilemmas that modern communities face through engagement with key works from more than thirty years of feminist science studies research.
Registration is now open!
Classes are on Mondays, last for 4 weeks, and cost $315 in total.
January 30-February 20, 6:30-9:30 PM
Learn more here

 

 DECEMBER

The Other Israel Film Festival
The Other Israel Film Festival uses film to foster social awareness and cultural understanding. The Festival presents dramatic and documentary films, as well as engaging panels about history, culture, and identity on the topic of minority populations in Israel. The films in this festival promote awareness and appreciation of the diversity of the state of Israel, provide a dynamic and inclusive forum for exploration of, and dialogue about populations on the margins of Israeli society. The festival ends on December 8th, so don’t miss out! Check out Lilith’s interview with festival founder Carole Zabar.
December 1-December 8
Learn more here.

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Trees of Life and Evil Eyes: A Contemporary Take on Superstition, Symbols and Mysticism
What role do superstitions and expressions of their associated symbols, play in today’s Jewish worlds? What need is there for protection through amulets or ritual practice? How do we navigate the gap between scientific explanations and irrational, all too human fears? This exhibition of work by contemporary artists, curated by Deborah Ugoretz and Tine Kindermann, in conjunction with Yiddish New York, a festival of music, language and culture, addresses these questions. The exhibition will run at the Abrazo Interno Gallery at the Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural Center. A special event and dance party with live Klezmer music will be held on December 24th, 2016 from 6-9 PM, for the opening of Yiddish New York.
December 8-December 28
Learn more here.

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A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt
The Brooklyn Museum is presenting new research—inspired by feminist scholarship—to tell unheard stories of gender transformation in the ancient world as a part of the yearlong project called A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum. The exhibition will showcase 25 works from the Museum’s Egyptian collection to explore differences between male and female access to the afterlife.
Opens December 15
Learn more here.

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Free National Webinar BRCA Genetic Testing: Understanding the Physical, Emotional, and Financial Challenges 

New studies and research recommend that Jews of Ashkenazi descent participate in population-wide BRCA genetic screening. On December 20th, Sharsheret is hosting a free BRCA genetics webinar, led by Genetics Program Coordinator, Peggy Cottrell, MS, CGC, and Director of Navigation and Support Services, Shera Dubitsky, MEd, MA. In this webinar, they will navigate and explore the physical, emotional, and financial considerations of expanded genetic testing, including prophylactic surgery, reconstruction, fertility, emotional, and insurance concerns. To register, email webinar@sharsheret.org or call 866-4742774.
December 20

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Uncommon Threads: Clothing & Textiles from the Yeshiva University Museum
Join curator Bonni-Dara Michaels for a tour of Yeshiva University Museum’s newest exhibitions featuring garments, textiles, and jewelry spanning three centuries. Highlights include a gold bracelet that belonged to the wife of the Hatam Sofer, a pearl and silver embroidered lectern cover of a Chief Rabbi of Izmir, a custom-made 1950 Hattie Carnegie wedding gown and a 1969 Ark curtain by Ina Golub for Temple Beth Ahm in New Jersey. Tickets are free, but reservations are required.
January 18
Learn more here

 

 NOVEMBER

New, award winning play by Jewish feminist playwright Paula J. Caplan opens November 9 for seven-week run at Cherry Lane Theatre Studio
Religious or not, Jews often practice Tikkun Olam—repairing the world—and in Paula J. Caplan’s unique, new, dual-award winning play, SHADES, the three members of the Arnold family have different ways of doing that repair, ways that sometimes bring them into conflict with each other and sometimes bring them closer together. They talk about whether it is only Jews or all people who have responsibility for repairing the world. The adult daughter, Val, is a nurse and the lead character in the play. Both her antiwar politics during the Vietnam War and her traditionally “feminine” socialization to be warm and expressive bring her up against her brother, who enlisted to serve in Vietnam and is almost militant about being emotionally reserved. She is recently widowed and harbors a secret that is tearing her apart, but her developing friendship with June, a Black woman who is physically paralyzed and emotionally straightforward, witty, and compassionate, brings strength and hope to them in different ways, including to June as inspiration for her to resume writing powerful poetry for the first time since she was injured. Val’s father is a World War II veteran, based on a real person, who was Captain of an all-Black artillery battery during the Battle of the Bulge and who talks about his relationships with his men. He is not the sort of person who talks about the ways he was bravely upfront about being Jewish even when in danger of being captured by the Nazis or about how he helped in his own way in the fight for civil rights for the Black men in his unit, but his children know these stories. Lilith readers are urged to use the HALFSHADES discount code at www.cherrylanetheatre.org. Talkbacks by a variety of great women and men—at least three of whom are Jewish—will follow six of the early performances and can be seen on the right side of the Facebook page.
Opens Wednesday, Novermber, 9
Learn more here.  

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Yael Dayan in Conversation with Susan Weidman Schneider 
Lilith’s Editor in Chief will be having a conversation with Yael Dayan at Bender JCC of Greater Washington. The JCC describes Dayan as: “a fierce political activist and parliamentarian for the left, a fighter for justice, women’s rights, gay rights and peace.” 
Thursday, November 3
Learn more here.

OCTOBER

Community Open House at the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA
The Yiddish Book Center is providing a full lineup of activities on October 23, including a film about Leonard Nimoy and a discussion of Yiddish printing practices. At 2:00 pm, “The Schaechter Sisters—Reyna and Temma—and their father, pianist Binyumen Schaechter, present ‘Something Old, Something New, Something Yiddish, Something Blue’, a cabaret-style concert of Yiddish songs old and new performed in a contemporary style, interspersed with English verses and translations.”
Sunday, October 23
Learn more here.

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Comedy and the Constitution at Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
“Free-speech pioneer. Satirist. Cultural Icon.” So reads the opening description of Brandeis’s two-day conference on comedian Lenny Bruce. The conference marks the official opening of a collection of Lenny Bruce materials that Brandeis has acquired from Bruce’s daughter, Kitty Bruce.  
Thursday, October 27- Friday, October 28
Learn more here.

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Kubrick + Kabbalah in San Francisco
As part of the Contemporary Jewish Museum’s exhibition on filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, CJM is hosting a series of 20 minute gallery talks. This one features Rabbi Aubrey L. Glazer discussing the “Kabbalistic poetry of Kubrick.”
Friday, October 28
Learn more here.

HIGH HOLIDAYS
From the Bay Area to the Mountains of Georgia.

Shana tova! As 5777 approaches, Lilith has assembled for you a batch of feminist opportunities to spend the Days of Awe. No matter what your High Holiday plans, look over this fascinatingly diverse list. From text studies, to chanting, to services free of charge and open to walk-ins, we hope you’ll feel inspired and renewed by seeing how you–or others– might celebrate the new year. Rosh Hashanah begins Sunday evening, October 2; Yom Kippur starts Tuesday evening, October 11.

(And if you know of an event you think should be added to the list, email us—fast!—to info@lilith.org)

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Pop-up Services in the Nation’s Capital
The Sixth and I Historic Synagogue will be offering, in addition to its full roster of longer services, a one-hour “High Holiday Pop-Up Service” at 5:30 pm on Rosh Hashanah afternoon October 3. “The Pop-up Service aims to accommodate those unable to secure morning service tickets, as well as those unable to take a day off from work to observe the holiday. The service makes space for all those who want to welcome in the New Year with prayer, reflection, and community.”
https://action.sixthandi.org/popup/service/

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High Holidays at Summer Camp in the North Georgia Mountains
Shalom b’Harim (Harim is Hebrew for mountains) is an unaffiliated synagogue in Dahlonega, GA with congregants who travel 50+ miles to attend. They usually rent space from a local church to meet once a month. However, for the High Holidays, congregants of Shalom b’Harim go to the Reform movement’s Camp Coleman in Cleveland, GA. Tashlikh is held at the fire circle by a lake with catfish and snapping turtles. “Every year since I was little we went to camp for High Holidays,” says Rachel Glazer, Community Engagement Fellow at the Institute of Southern Jewish Life. “Even before I understood camp as a place that was for the summertime and kids running around, I understood it as a place full of grumpy older people blowing the shofar and being grouchy that we were fasting.”
http://www.shalombharim.org/

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Community Tashlikh at Dimond Park in Oakland, CA at 5:15 pm on October 3
Reform, Conservative and Orthodox congregations team up to perform this ritual together at the start of the new year. A female rabbi might stand next to an Orthodox man as together they reflect on the year gone by and watch the crumbs they tossed into the moving water float away, carrying regret with them. The participating congregants of Beth Abraham, Beth Jacob and Temple Sinai will gather together on Monday, October 3 at 5:15 pm at Dimond Park.

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Reflect with Chanting Expert Rabbi Shefa Gold in Santa Monica, CA
Listed as one of the Forward’s 33 most influential rabbis of 2015, Renewal Rabbi Shefa Gold runs Kol Zimra, a chant leadership training program. This year she’ll be leading High Holiday services at the Santa Monica Synagogue with Metivta, a center for “reflective Judaism” in California. “Turn towards your practice, towards each other, towards the Great Mystery that is just waiting for our attention, to be revealed,” Gold encourages participants. “Pay attention to the questions that emerge, to the promptings of your heart, to the deeper longings that pull you.”
http://metivta.org/

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Having a Vulnerable New Year in Philadelphia, PA
Congregation Kol Tzedek’s theme for their services for the new year is “vulnerability.” Members and non-members alike are welcome—at no cost—at this Reconstructionist synagogue for the High Holidays. “Through song, silence, sharing and schmoozing, we will open our hearts, heal, connect and transform.”
http://www.kol-tzedek.org/high-holidays.html

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Ponder Jonah and the Whale at Kolot Chayeinu in Brooklyn, NY
This Brooklyn synagogue led by Rabbi Ellen Lippmann, Cantor Lisa B. Segal, and student Rabbi Miriam Grossman has a full line up of High Holiday services. On Yom Kippur, the former artistic director of Storahtelling, Franny Silverman, will lead an interactive text study of Jonah and the Whale. All are welcome, free of charge.
http://kolotchayeinu.org/pdfs/PDF%20of%20HHD%20brochure.pdf

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Walk-ins Welcome Services throughout NYC
In Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens, Ohel Ayalah will be holding egalitarian and traditional services that are welcome to all, free of charge. They’re especially geared towards folks in their 20s and 30s and/or Israelis and Russians who might feel alienated from other established Jewish communities. Rabbi Judith Hauptman, a professor of Talmud at the Jewish Theological seminary, will be leading the Manhattan services.
http://www.ohelayalah.org/events/highholydays


SEPTEMBER

Sharon Goldman’s Kol Isha (A Woman’s Voice) Concert
Folk music. Feminist anthems. A song titled “Lilith.”
Rockwood Music Hall, New York, NY.
September 7, 2016.  6:30 pm.
For additional tour dates and to learn more click here

*****

The Sacred Calling: Then and Now
Four rabbis discussing four decades of women in the rabbinate.
Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion. New York, NY.
September 8, 2016. 11:00 am.
Learn more here.

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Paint by Numbers
Over 50 artists create pieces inspired by Jewish numerology.
Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion Museum. New York, NY.
Opening Reception: September 8, 2016. 6:00-8:00 pm.
Learn more here

*****

Siona Benjamin: Beyond Borders
Multimedia art exploring questions of identity, place, and belonging.
Opalka Gallery, Albany, NY
Opening Reception September 8, 2016. 6:00-8:00 pm.
Learn more here

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March with Jewish Labor Committee
Spend your Shabbat praying with your feet.
Meet at 44th St and 5th Ave, New York, NY.
September 10, 2016. 9:45 am – 11:00 am.
Learn more here

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Michelle Brafman Reading From Her New Book,Bertrand Court
Get this award-winning Lilith fiction author’s autograph at this reading.
Politics and Prose. Washington, DC.
September 10, 2016. 6:00 pm.
Learn more here

*****

ARt, ARchitecture & AR: Augmented Reality & Jewish Art
An interactive exhibit of layered Lower East Side history. Explore with your smart phone.
Art Kibbutz. Governors Island, NY.
Reception September 11, 2016. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm.
Learn more here

*****

“Three Balconies and a Door” Art Opening
In this mixed-media art exhibit, each balcony is a community.
Manny Cantor Center. New York, NY.
Reception September 12, 2016. 6:30 – 8:00 pm.
Learn more here

*****

Spotlight on Adolescent Girls Mental Health
Suicide is the leading cause in death in teen girls worldwide. Join JWFNY in being part of the solution.
130 East 59th Street, New York, NY.
September 14, 2016. 11:30 – 1:00 pm.
RSVP required.
Learn more here

*****

EREZ Touring in the US
Internationally acclaimed singer-songwriter Erez Sivan performing on American stages
Silvana. New York, NY. 
September 28, 2016. 9:00 – 10:00 pm. 
For additional tour dates and to learn more click here


Join a Community of Lilith readers nationwide!

Lilith salons are up and running in over 90 cities across North America! Are you a member of a Reform congregation or a National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW) section?  You can be part on an ongoing Lilith salon right in your own community. Or you can start your own Lilith salon by inviting friends to discuss the current issue; you provide the snacks and Lilith will provide background material and trigger questions. Learn more


 Please send suggestions for listings to info@Lilith.org!