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In this issue: JAP-baiting on campus—it’s an epidemic of graffiti and abuse; students grapple with Jewish stereotypes; how Syracuse University confronted the problem. The passionate legacy of Malka Heifetz Tussman, Yiddish poet. Jewish women/Jewish men: why do many Jews see themselves (and each other) as dull partners? The writing on the wall: the prescient German Jewish women who saw what was coming.

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“JAP”-Baiting on the College Scene

Sherry Chayat

Where--and why--the stereotypes about Jewish women are still flourishing. How they've damaged our self-esteem and relations between the sexes. 

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Reading the Writing on the Wall

by Claudia Koonz

As the Nazis consolidated their power in the 1930’s, German Jewish women sensed the threat sooner and saw it as more dangerous than the men did. Historian Koonz sorts out the reasons.

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Jewish Women/Jewish Men Detoxifying Our Relationships

by Susan Weidman Schneider

Many Jews see themselves (and each other) as asexual and passionless. Ethnotherapist Perel tells us why these and other negative in-group images and ambivalent feelings about Jewish identity lead Jewish women and men to reject each other.

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Mother Nature and Human Nature: The poetry of “Malka Heifetz Tussman”

by Marcia Falk

One of the Many gifted women of her generation writing in Yiddish, Tussman—who died last spring at 91—is remembered here by a younger poet. An added attraction: Falk’s translation of Tussman’s poetry.

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What Remains is Random

fiction by Norma Fain Pratt

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Taking the Law into Our Own Hands

by A.C.

Announcing a new column where women can pose questions abut their own lives which they feel require halachic (Jewish legal) responses. The religious arbiters creating the answers will be all women scholars—a first!

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