by Miriam Stone

The Shame of the Jap

When a Jewish woman comes to the table as a community activist in America—whether she wants to get involved with a campus environmental group or her local P.T.A.— certain assumptions precede her. She is white, so she can’t possibly understand the struggle of non-white minorities. She is Jewish, so she is probably wealthy and therefore distant from the “people’s” struggle. If she wants to be taken seriously, she has to prove that she belongs, or no one will believe her. Trouble is, she probably doesn’t believe it herself

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The JAP

The articles in this special section:

The Shame of the Jap

by Miriam Stone

Miriam Stone argues that the image is a larger-than-life caricature, casting a shadow over women trying to walk the walk as activists for social change.