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Link Roundup: Remembering the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.  Check out the Jewish Daily Forward for more information about the tragic fire and to read original coverage from the Yiddish Forverts. [The Forward]

UPDATED: Take a look back at Lilith’s previous commemoration of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, retold in comic-strip form by Trina Robbins. [Lilith]

Famous convert and Hollywood icon, Elizabeth Taylor died of congestive heart failure this past Wednesday. Elizabeth converted to Judaism in 1959 and was deeply committed to Jewish and Israeli causes during her lifetime. [The Forward]

A bomb went off at a crowded bus stop in Jerusalem on Wednesday, leaving 1 dead and 30 injured. The victims were rushed to Hadassah Hospital in Ein Karem. [Ha’aretz]

In light of the recent attacks on Israel, Allison Kaplan Sommer wrote about the practical fashion choices Israeli women must make in case of a rocket attack. [The Sisterhood]

Amnesty International is condemning Egyptian authorities for forcing female protestors to take “virginity tests.” At least 18 women have come forward as victims of the invasive “tests” and have reported being brutally attacked while being held in military detention. [Jezebel]

Princeton University’s Steering Committee on Undergraduate Women’s Leadership released a report on the gender gap in undergraduate leadership positions. The committee found that female students often took less visible jobs, were discouraged from taking more prominent leadership roles, and frequently undersold their accomplishments. The report also stated that, “Women are expected to be poised, witty, and smart—but not so witty or smart as to be threatening to men.” Though the report looked only at Princeton students, the study has wide relevance–to collegiate females everywhere and to all interested in women’s leadership. [Princeton University]