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In this issue: Creating sacred space at summer camp, in a closet, or in a basement.  The shock of finding out that you’re Jewish. Sex, or scholarship? Unlike Judaism, medieval Christianity allowed celibate women to use their minds like men. Order a commemorative plate marking the grand occasions of getting a grant or finding a comfortable bra.

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The Mysteries of Sacred Space

Architects have always known the place can affect our feelings of holiness. Now we have clues about how women’s experiences can create a holy space in the cellar of a shul, under a tree, behind a file cabinet, even (despite the objections of men) at the Western Wall.

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Dudu in Heaven

fiction by Deborah Reich

Dudu left for the Six Day War without saying goodbye. Years later, his sister (with a son who looks just like him) meets up with Dudu again. Bring your hanky.

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The Persistence of Memory

fiction by Elissa P. Matthews

Secrets leak out of the fissures in a crumbling family system when the nice Jewish doctor son comes out as a homosexual. Trying to repair the damage, an aunt blows the cover on his mother’s Holocaust past.

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Wayward Hearts

fiction by Nancy Reisman

Slowly, slowly, a young, pregnant and faithful Buffalo wife in the 1950’s falls into a sexual trance over the unbidden attention of a newly widowed man. Then her sister takes over

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Louise Kehoe Converts: Why?

Before Mary Gordon found out that her father was Jewish, Louise Kehoe had penetrated her dead father’s final legacy—-he was no lapsed Romanoff living in rural England, but a tortured shtetl Jew, in disguise. After suffering both his denial and his cruelties, she emerges as a Jew too.

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Trade-Off: Sex or Scholarship?

by Emily Taitz

Unlike Judaism, medieval Christianity had a loophole that allowed some women to use their minds as if they were men. The loophole? Celibacy.

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The World According to Women

by Susan Schnur

Never mind Charles-and-Di mugs. LILITH finds a ceramist--Sandy Goldberg--who commemorates what really matters in life, with plates for your sideboard making the grand occasions of getting a grant or finding a comfortable bra.

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Subscriber Exclusive