summercover

In this issue: women re-make the tashlich ritual, experience conversion, go defiantly to college, recount their kisses. A firsthand account of a terror attack in Jerusalem. A feminist wields an accordion. What the Bible left out about Lot’s wife. Decoding contemporary Russian-Jewish novels and Roz Chast’s sorrowful humor. Plus: what happens when a feminist goes to summer camp?

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Recounting

Courtney Sender

A short story by Courtney Sender

The Shabbat Before Her Wedding

a poem by Jamie Wendt

Photo credit: Foundation for Jewish Camp

A Feminist Camp Counselor Unpacks Her Baggage

Maya Zinkow

Is camp a place for exploration —or indoctrination? Maya Zinkow speaks out on sex, ritual and gender identity in Jewish summer camp. 

"Cleft" by Mary Frank. Reproduced with permission of artist and DC Moore Gallery

Lot’s Wife

Michal Lemberger

A biblical revisioning 

Deganit Stern Schocken, Mouth, pendant from the series “Figure of Speech”, 2011, stainless steel, polystyrene, gold, silver, zircon, nylon, cotton thread.

The Art of Ornament

Laura Kruger

From Yemenite wedding ornaments to daring modernist designs, Israel’s creators of wearable art cross cultural divides. How did they become such boundary breakers? 

Natasha Basin-Levina (1951–2013) emigrated to Israel from Moscow in 1970. She worked as a journalist and editor for Israeli radio and for Kol Yisrael television, where she was head of news and Russian-language programs, but much of her writing was discovered only after her death. This autobiographical story was first published in the Jerusalem Russian-language journal Alternativa, under the title “Terror on Ben Yehuda Street” [“Terakt na Ben-Iegude”].

The Explosion

Natasha Basin Levina, translated by Sonia Melnikova-Raich

The writer witnesses terrorism from her kitchen and can’t make sense of why her face is front-page news. 

By Unknown artist from Iran [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Under the Covers

Esther Amini

What happens when her Persian father won’t let her go to college.

Detail from “Sabbath,” oil pastel, by Marcia Falk

Change Beckons

Susan Schnur

Cut Me Loose, a memoir by Leah Vincent

Cut Loose

Leah Vincent

In which a seventeen-year-old struggles to live solo in New York, sent away by her ultra-Orthodox family. 

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