Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

Augmented Reality and Jewish Art

What: Artists Cynthia Beth Rubin and Yona Verwer will hold an informal reception for their exhibit: “ARt, ARchitecture & AR: Augmented Reality & Jewish Art.” The series, “History, Heritage, and the Lower East Side” incorporates digital technology. Your smart phone can cause videos embedded in the pieces to begin playing. The exhibit layers history using paint, photography, video recordings, and sound. 

WhereArt Kibbutz
Nolan Park, Building 6-B, Governors Island, NY, USA. 

When: Sunday, September 11, 2016. 11:00 am – 6:00 pm. The exhibit can be seen during those same hours on Sunday, September 4, 2016 and Sunday, September 18, 2016. 

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Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

Author Michelle Brafman at D.C.’s Politics and Prose

bertrand courtWhat: Award-winning Lilith author Michelle Brafman will do a reading of her newly released book, Bertrand Court. This novel tells the stories of 17 interconnected characters, ranging from politicos to filmmakers, all linked to a suburban cul-de-sac in Washington, DC. After the reading, she will also sign copies.

Where:   Politics and Prose Bookstore. 5015 Connecticut Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20008, USA. 

When: Saturday, September 10. 6:00 pm. 

 

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Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

March with the Jewish Labor Committee

Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 4.01.17 PMWhat: March with the Jewish Labor Committee for New York City’s 2016 Labor Day Parade to “show your support for workers’ rights and the continued link between the Jewish community and the labor movement!”

RSVP at info@jewishlabor.org or 212-477-1380.

Where: The group will be meeting at the corner of 44th Street, just east of 5th Avenue and will march onward from there. 

When: Saturday, September 10, 2016. 9:45 – 11:00 am. 

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Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

“Siona Benjamin: Beyond Borders” Art Exhibition Opens in Albany

siona benjaminWhat: The opening reception a new exhibit for Siona Benjamin’s multimedia art. Originally from Mumbai, now living in the US, Benjamin holds MFA degrees in both painting and theater set design. Her multimedia work reflects her background as a Jewish Indian woman raised in a predominantly Hindu and Muslim India and educated in Catholic and Zoroastrian schools. Inspired by traditions as diverse as Indian miniature painting, Byzantine icons, illuminated manuscripts, and American Pop Art, she combines the imagery of her past with the role she plays in America today, making a mosaic that includes cultural, religious, and feminist narratives.
 
Featuring over 80 works, this survey will include examples from her early series, Finding Home, begun in the 90s, on up through her current project, Exodus: I See Myself in You, about the struggles of Syrian refugees. Many of her figures, such as the female characters in Finding Home, have blue skin. It’s a color Benjamin says she picked for its neutrality to represent her “skin color as being a Jewish woman of color, of being the other, of being transcultural, of belonging everywhere and nowhere at the same time.”
 
Where:  Opalka Gallery, 140 New Scotland Ave.
Albany, NY 12208. 
 
When: Thursday, September 8, 2016. Artist lecture at 5:00 pm. Opening reception from 6:00-8:00 pm. Exhibition closes October 9, 2016. 

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Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

Painting with Jewish Numbers

Henry Bismuth, Fourteen, 2016, Oil on canvas

Henry Bismuth, Fourteen, 2016, Oil on canvas

What:  ”Numbers are integral to Jewish rituals, belief, significant historical dates, and daily life. Numbers and numerology have been at the core of Biblical understanding since the Bible was codified and possibly before. Inescapable, numbers are the global language of humanity. More than fifty contemporary artists illuminate the meaning of numbers and their symbolism through a broad range of artistic media.” So reads the description from the event organizers about a new exhibit, “Paint by Numbers,” which celebrates its opening with an artists reception. 

Where: Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion Museum. One West Fourth Street between Broadway and Mercer Street, New York, New York, USA. 

When: Thursday, September 8, 2016. 6:00-8:00 pm with a program beginning at 7:00 pm. Register here. 

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Current Events

September 6, 2016 by

Folk Music and Jewish Identity in NYC

sharongoldmanmusic.com

sharongoldmanmusic.com

What: Sharon Goldman performs a full band show to release her new album KOL ISHA (A Woman’s Voice). Goldman’s sound is melodic, deriving from the tradition of Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan. 

The album explores Goldman’s Orthodox Jewish childhood and her now-secular adulthood. Song titles include “Pillar of Salt,” “Song of Songs,” “The Sabbath Queen,” and “Lilith.” (We’re particularly excited by the latter). 

Where: Rockwood Music Hall, 196 Allen St New York, NY, USA. 

When Wednesday, September 7, 6:30 pm. See her website for dates and times of other performances, including in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut. 

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Live from the Lilith Blog

August 29, 2016 by

Community Colleges Are Often Ridiculed. This One-Woman Show Prods Us to Value Their Students More.

ronnalevy.com

Ask most middle-class Americans to conjure up images of college students and they may picture Frisbee-throwing kids on a campus green, political protests, all-night cram sessions in a smoky room and beer. Lots of beer. But for the 50 percent of U.S. students who begin undergraduate life at a community college, more often than not commuting to school from their childhood bedrooms, the campus stereotype is completely disconnected from reality.

And actor-playwright-teacher Ronna J. Levy [ronnalevy.com] wants to be sure you know this.

Her one-woman play “This Gonna Be On the Test, Miss?” introduces audiences to the diverse students who’ve found their way into the developmental – sometimes called remedial – English classes she has taught for more than two decades. It also offers an insightful look into the joys and frustrations of teaching in this setting.

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Live from the Lilith Blog

August 18, 2016 by

Learning to Feel My Worth as a Jew — In Spite of the Gawks and Sneers

Suzie Tremmel

Suzie Tremmel

In typical Catholic-school fashion, I began resisting my religious education in middle school. But while my teachers might have thought differently, I never meant to disparage Catholicism. I asked questions because I craved answers, not because I wanted to be confrontational or facilitate classroom disruption. I had misgivings about Jesus, and longed for a more nuanced relationship with G-d that didn’t fixate on sin and the afterlife.

During my sophomore year at a secular high school, a friend invited me to her family’s Passover Seder. After one night of following along in the Haggadah and listening to everyone chant in Hebrew, I felt something inside me roar to life. I had never felt so enthusiastic in my 16 Christian years, and drove home afterwards trying to hold onto the spark of fascination, worried that it might somehow escape. It never occurred to me that Judaism was something I could join; I resigned myself to the fact that in spite of my deep admiration and curiosity, my relationship with Judaism would be limited to admiring it from the outside. When I finally learned that I could convert, that spark that I’d felt before grew even stronger. But my omnipresent anxiety made it seem too good to be true—almost too easy.

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Live from the Lilith Blog

August 17, 2016 by

Tattooing Family Memories

anna lily“They are beautiful,” an elderly relative once admitted to me at a family gathering, “but now you have to find a nice Jewish man who will accept both you and your tattoos.”

I thanked her and laughed, genuinely surprised her reaction was not as harsh as I had imagined. Still, I wanted to play it safe and avoid any awkwardness, so I redirected our conversation accordingly.

While these words were coming from a good place, and from someone who values my happiness and wellbeing, they implied several things. First, that my tattoos are a detriment to my femininity. Second, that it will be difficult to find a man of my culture who will marry me with my now tainted skin. And, finally, that I am even looking for a man.

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Live from the Lilith Blog

August 11, 2016 by

This Jewish Women’s Foundation New Grant Policy Is Already Spurring Change

Screenshot 2016-08-11 11.49.09

On August 4, the Jewish Women’s Foundation of New York (JWFNY) published an editorial in The Forward explaining a dramatic new policy to award grants only to organizations offering their employees at least four weeks of paid parental leave.

The response on social media was positive––and swift. And, significantly, the editorial also caught the attention of employers. “Three organizations have already talked to me saying that they’re going to revisit their policy,” says Stephanie Blumenkranz, Assistant Director of JWFNY.

The changes decided on by the JWFNY board were driven, says Blumenkranz, by a desire to take concrete action. “We’ve advocated for paid parental leave for a few years now, and for us to be true advocates we can’t just talk about it. We have to do something about it. Because we’re a foundation, we felt that the best way to bring about change was with our grantmaking dollars.”

Julie Sissman, a JWFNY member who was part of crafting the new policy, noted the significance of specifying parental leave as opposed to just maternity leave. “It is important to be bold and not stand on the sidelines of the national conversation about parental leave. To achieve gender equity we need systems in place that break women and men and people of all gender identities out of gender-stereotyped silos and assumptions. All employees starting their lives as new parents need equal support. Paid parental leave is a key component of creating real change,” says Sissman.

Blumenkranz called the response to the new policy very positive. “A lot of people, especially in the Jewish community, felt like this was really needed.”

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