Link Roundups

Link Roundups

April 1, 2011 by

Link Roundup: A Look Back at Geraldine Ferraro

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Former U.S. Vice Presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro died this past Saturday at the age of 75. Ferraro, a major women’s rights activist, broke the glass ceiling when she became “the first woman nominated for national office by a major party.” [NY Times]

Letty Cottin Pogrebin wrote a touching, heartfelt remembrance of her friend, Geraldine Ferraro. [Women's Media Center]

On Wednesday, March 30, U.S. Representative Carolyn Maloney and U.S. Senator Susan Collins reintroduced The National Women’s History Museum Act (HR 1269 and S 680). The bill would authorize the sale and use of the land adjoining the National Mall in Washington, DC for the museum’s future site. [Post Gazette]

In light of Elizabeth Taylor’s passing, CNN profiled her conversion to Judaism. The article also highlighted Taylor’s involvement with Lilith, adding “And in 1987, she was among those who signed an appeal launched by a Jewish feminist magazine, Lilith, to free Soviet refusenik Ida Nudel.” [CNN]

Renée Levine Melammed, dean of the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies and editor of NASHIM, wrote about the 19th century discovery of various archives in Elephantine. The archives contained documents about a woman named Mibtahiah, who has become the earliest documented Jewish women in history. According to Melammed, the documents “reveal surprising details concerning her life and the options available to Jewish women in this settlement.” [Jerusalem Post]

Anat Hoffman of the Israel Religious Action Center (IRAC) and Women of the Wall was profiled in New Voices this week for her efforts toward religious pluralism. Hoffman was arrested last year for carrying a Torah at the Western Wall. [New Voices]

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Link Roundups

March 25, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Remembering the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.  Check out the Jewish Daily Forward for more information about the tragic fire and to read original coverage from the Yiddish Forverts. [The Forward]

UPDATED: Take a look back at Lilith’s previous commemoration of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, retold in comic-strip form by Trina Robbins. [Lilith]

Famous convert and Hollywood icon, Elizabeth Taylor died of congestive heart failure this past Wednesday. Elizabeth converted to Judaism in 1959 and was deeply committed to Jewish and Israeli causes during her lifetime. [The Forward]

A bomb went off at a crowded bus stop in Jerusalem on Wednesday, leaving 1 dead and 30 injured. The victims were rushed to Hadassah Hospital in Ein Karem. [Ha’aretz]

In light of the recent attacks on Israel, Allison Kaplan Sommer wrote about the practical fashion choices Israeli women must make in case of a rocket attack. [The Sisterhood]

Amnesty International is condemning Egyptian authorities for forcing female protestors to take “virginity tests.” At least 18 women have come forward as victims of the invasive “tests” and have reported being brutally attacked while being held in military detention. [Jezebel]

Princeton University’s Steering Committee on Undergraduate Women’s Leadership released a report on the gender gap in undergraduate leadership positions. The committee found that female students often took less visible jobs, were discouraged from taking more prominent leadership roles, and frequently undersold their accomplishments. The report also stated that, “Women are expected to be poised, witty, and smart—but not so witty or smart as to be threatening to men.” Though the report looked only at Princeton students, the study has wide relevance–to collegiate females everywhere and to all interested in women’s leadership. [Princeton University]

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Link Roundups

March 18, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Marriage, Divorce, and Purim

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

With Purim beginning tomorrow night, Yosef Goldman reminds us of the objectification of women mentioned in the megillah and offers ideas on how to celebrate the holiday feminist-style. [Jewschool]

When it comes to Purim costumes, parenting columnist Marjorie Ingall asks why we are more comfortable with little girls dressed up like boys than little boys dressed up like girls. [Tablet Magazine]

In honor International Agunot Day, which occurred yesterday on the Fast of Esther, the National Council of Jewish Women called upon Israel’s Knesset to enact divorce reform. The term aguna, literally meaning anchored or chained, refers to a woman who is “chained” to a marriage and is unable to remarry because her husband refuses to grant her a get, a divorce document required by Jewish law. [NCJW]

Is the word “Jewess” an ethnic slur? Sala Levin explores the history of the “retro” term that is currently making a comeback. [Moment]

Slate writer KJ Dell’Antonia described the backlash against parenting bloggers who write about not loving their children and what comments cross the line. [Double X]

An Israeli couple is awaiting a decision from Israel’s attorney general on whether or not they have the right to their deceased son’s frozen sperm. Their son, Ohad Ben-Yaakov, was not married and died at the age of 27 due to a work-related accident. If granted permission, the couple hopes to find a surrogate carrier to give birth to their posthumous grandchildren. Currently, Israel law only allows the wife or partner of the deceased the right to use the sperm for posthumous reproduction. [Tablet Magazine]

On Wednesday, a bill to repeal the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. If repealed, it would lift the ban on same-sex marriage in the United States. [Washington Blade]

Israeli Rabbis from the religious Zionist community launched an initiative to marry gay men to lesbian women. So far they have performed 11 of these marriages. [Ha’aretz]

In response to the devastating tsunami in Japan, Jewish and Israeli groups rushed to send support. Israeli organizations Zaka and IsraAid sent search-and-rescue teams to Japan, while many Jewish groups are working hard to raise money to help with relief efforts. The Chabad center in Tokyo has also been sending food and supplies for a bakery that the organization commissioned in the city of Sendai. Visit here to find out how you can help the victims.  [JWeekly]

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Link Roundups

March 12, 2011 by

Link Roundup: International Women's Day and the Fight for Equality

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Women around the world gathered together on Tuesday, March 8th in honor of the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. Many women spent the day participating in protests, marches, and other festivities to celebrate the fight for women’s equality. [NPR]

Dr. Rachel Levmore explored how the day is used as a a platform for what is known in Jewish tradition as cheshbon hanefesh – a combination of account-taking and reflection.” [JPost]

Rabbi Laura Geller also wrote an excellent piece in honor of International Women’s Day about the advancement of Jewish women. [Huffington Post]

Yad L’Achim, a Haredi organization in Israel, recently began rescuing Jewish women from their abusive Muslim husbands in the Palestinian Authority. Feminists have been known to remain silent on issues regarding Islamic women and girls. Caroline Glick writes, “It is not feminism that motivates its members to save these women. It is Jewish law.” [JPost]

The Puah Institute introduced a new course designed to teach rabbis how to offer sex counseling to ultra-religious couples. The course will also offer its students a “sexual counselor” certificate. [Ynet]

On Monday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor discussed the sexist nature of her confirmation hearing, in which she was asked a series of questions about her dating life. [The Atlantic]

On Wednesday, the U.S. Senate rejected the U.S. House’s spending bill that would have stripped Planned Parenthood of all federal funding. Despite this victory for pro-choice groups, the GOP plans to continue fighting for the defunding of Planned Parenthood and its other anti-choice legislation. [Women’s eNews] [Kaiser Health News]

Individual states have also taken extreme measures in the war against women’s reproductive health. South Dakota’s Senate passed a bill requiring women to wait 72-hours and visit an anti-abortion “crisis pregnancy center (CPC)” before being able to obtain an abortion. [NPR] Indiana introduced a bill that would require doctors to tell women that having an abortion is linked to breast cancer. The bill would also outlaw abortions after 20 weeks and require women to view an ultrasound of the fetus. [Huffington Post]

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Link Roundups

February 25, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Sexism and Anti-Semitism

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Following CBS correspondent Lara Logan’s sexual assault in Egypt, many journalists have made offensive remarks citing Logan’s good looks as a reason for her attack. Israeli journalist Tsafi Saar shared her thoughts on the controversy. [Haaretz]

On Tuesday, Fox news correspondent Glenn Beck compared Reform Judaism to radical Islam in response to an open letter signed by 400 rabbis to Rupert Murdoch. The letter was coordinated by Jewish Funds for Justice and criticized Beck for comparing his enemies to Nazis. Beck has since issued an apology. [URJ]

John Galliano, fashion designer and creative director of Christian Dior, was arrested in Paris last night following an anti-Semitic attack on a local couple. He has since been suspended from the fashion label and Dior C.E.O. Sidney Toledano issued a statement citing the company’s zero tolerance policy “towards any anti-Semitic or racist words or behaviour.” [The Shmooze]

The Obama administration announced that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional and has asked the U.S. Department of Justice to no longer defend it in court. [Huffington Post]

In addition, the Obama administration replaced the “Conscience” rule enacted by the Bush administration. The “conscience” rule protected health care workers who refused to perform abortions, sterilizations, in-vitro fertilization, or to provide referrals for patients based on their religious beliefs. [Washington Post]

Last week, seventeen veterans and active-duty service members of the U.S. Military filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Defense, specifically Defense Secretary Robert Gates and former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, for failure to take action after they reported being sexually assaulted or raped. [Jezebel]

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Link Roundups

February 18, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Legislation Against Choice

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about,email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Breaking news: Just moments ago, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Pence Amendment in a vote of 240-185. The Amendment would strip Planned Parenthood of receiving federal funds for any of the organization’s services. [L.A. Times]  For some more background, also see here and here.

South Dakota made headlines this week after introducing a bill that would “ expand the definition of justifiable homicide to provide for the protection of certain unborn children.” Critics of the law argued that, if passed, the law would legalize the killing of abortion providers. [Mother Jones]

The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Phil Jensen, responded to the criticisms, claiming that the bill has “has nothing to do with abortion.” The bill has now been shelved while lawmakers decide whether or not to amend the language or drop it completely. [NY Times]

CBS correspondent Lara Logan was sexually assaulted by an angry mob in Egypt last Friday. Her attackers were reportedly yelling, “Jew! Jew!” as she was brutally attacked. [NY Post]  For some thoughts on how to respond helpfully and compassionately when someone who is the victim of a rape tries to tell you her story, see here.

Maryland may be the next state to allow gay marriage. Yesterday, the Maryland Senate Judicial Proceeding Committee passed the Religious Freedom and Civil Marriage Protection Act (SB 116). The state Senate is scheduled to vote on the bill next week. [Ms. Magazine]

On Wednesday, Hawaii Legislature passed a bill allowing civil unions for same-sex couples. [NPR]

-Jill Finkelstein

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Link Roundups

February 11, 2011 by

Link Roundup: A Fight for Reproductive Rights

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

Delaware Employment Law Blog

This week, Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) announced its plans to sign onto Advancing Women Professionals and the Jewish Community’s (AWP) Better Work, Better Life Campaign and adopting the campaign’s family-friendly policies. Policies promoted by the campaign include a longer paid maternity/paternity leave for new parents, flexible work -hours, and the ability to work from home if needed. [The Forward]

On Tuesday, the U.S. House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution held a hearing on “H.R. 3, the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act.” During the hearing, Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) argued that the H.R. 3 provisions could hurt the tax-exempt status of religious groups. [Huffington Post]

One of the provisions for H.R. 3 includes denying government funding to any organization providing abortion services. Slate pointed out that cutting funding from Planned Parenthood would actually end up costing taxpayers more since the organization’s family planning efforts currently save Medicaid $4.02 for every $1 received from the federal government. [Double X]

In other political news, as part of his repeal attempts, U.S. Speaker of the House John Boehner plans to reintroduce the “global gag” rule, also known as the Mexico City Policy.  This policy “prevents US overseas assistance from going to [organizations] that provide information on abortion, perform abortions or direct women to abortion providers.” [Guardian UK]

Yesterday, the IRS revealed that it would be giving tax breaks to breastfeeding mothers to help pay for the cost of pumps and other nursing supplies. [Ms. Magazine]

Throughout history, men have largely dominated the technology field. However, the American Association of University Women (AAUW) recently released the results of three studies that revealed the reason behind this problem and offered solutions to increase the female presence in the field. [Huffington Post]

Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion recently announced that it would be renaming its School of Sacred Music in memory of Debbie Friedman. Debbie had served as a faculty member since 2007. [eJewishPhilanthropy]

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Link Roundups

February 6, 2011 by

Link Roundup: The Rape Debate and Crisis in Egypt

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

In the wake of the crisis in Egypt, women have been urged not to participate in the protests due to the increased safety risks. Despite the images in the news of men being the primary force behind the uprising, women have been very present in the protests. [Feminist Peace Network]

The House GOP recently stirred up major controversy when they proposed the No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act. The Act planned to drastically limit the number of federally funded abortions by changing the definition of “rape” to only include “forcible rape” cases. The bill also planned to limit incest-related abortions to women under 18. [Mother Jones]

In the face of harsh criticism, mockery, and a growing Twitter protest, the GOP was eventually forced to change the wording of the proposed bill. The bill will now use the same language as the Hyde Amendment, which bans federal funding for abortions through Medicaid except in cases of rape, incest, or to save a mother’s life. [Politico]

Is Facebook causing eating disorders? A new study from the University of Haifa found that “young women who frequently use the social networking site are more susceptible to eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia.” [NY Jewish Week]

On March 8th, Harvard University is hosting its second annual Feminist Coming Out Day. The event was inspired by National Coming Out Day. Harvard has recently partnered with Bitch Magazine in hopes of taking the event to a national level. [Feminist Coming Out Day]

American Jewish World Service is starting a campaign asking American Jews to stand in solidarity with Uganda’s LGBTI community following the murder of activist David Kato. To sign the pledge, visit http://ajws.org/lgbtistatement.

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Link Roundups

January 21, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Tiger Mom Backlash and Healthcare Reform

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

On Wednesday, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to repeal the new healthcare bill. Women’s Rights organizations have been up in arms following the vote. The National Women’s Law Center released a statement on what the repeal could mean for women. [NWLC]

House Republicans are currently working on their own healthcare changes that include a ban on federally funded abortions. Coincidentally, tomorrow marks the 38th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. [NY Times]

Author Amy Chua recently faced a backlash after the Wall Street Journal published her essay entitled “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior,” an excerpt from her book, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother. Ayelet Waldman, Jewish mom and author of Bad Mother, responded to Chua’s harsh criticism of Western parenting. [WSJ]

The U.S. was not the only country to host a beauty pageant this past week… Last weekend, Israel hosted its 15th annual Fat and Beautiful pageant. The pageant has a minimum weight requirement of 80kg (approximately 176lbs) and shows that beauty comes in all shapes and sizes. [Fit Perez]

In honor of the upcoming 60th anniversary of Sydney Taylor’s All-of-a-Kind Family series, Marjorie Ingall looked back on one of America’s most beloved fictional families. To this day, the books’ stories of sisterhood still remain relatable to young girls everywhere. [Tablet Magazine]

A recent study revealed a startling pay gap in among non-profit organizations with budgets greater than $5 million. Women executives for these organizations earn an average yearly salary of $401,000, while their male counterparts earn an average of $621,000. [Ms. Magazine]

The Forward is currently sponsoring a poetry contest in honor of the upcoming 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire. Submissions will be accepted until February 14th and may be in English or Yiddish. [Tablet Magazine]

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Link Roundups

January 14, 2011 by

Link Roundup: Tragedy and Race Relations

Welcome to this week’s installment of Lilith’s Link Roundup. Each week we post Jewish and feminist highlights from around the web. If there’s anything you want to be sure we know about, email us or leave a message in the comments section below.

This past week was filled with deep sadness in the Jewish community following the loss of beloved singer/songwriter, Debbie Friedman, and the tragic shooting in Tuscon, Arizona that left 6 people dead and 14 injured, including U.S. Representative, Gabrielle Giffords. Despite being left in critical condition, Giffords is making remarkable progress towards recovery. [NY Times]

Sarah Palin took some heat this week after she released a video accusing journalists and pundits of manufacturing “blood libel” in response to the Tuscon shooting. The term “blood libel,” which has been used to describe false claims that Jews murdered Christian babies in order to use their blood for religious rituals. These accusations date back to medieval times and have been used to justify the persecution of Jews throughout history. [NPR]

Wednesday, January 12th, marked the 1-year anniversary of the devastating earthquake that left Haiti in ruins. UN Women released a short documentary highlighting the spike in violence against Haitian women over the past year, as the country works hard to rebuild. [Youtube]

In honor of Martin Luther King Day, JTA reporter, Sue Fishkoff interviewed the prominent rabbinical supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. The rabbis recalled the historic day when they marched with Martin Luther King Jr. and reflected on the hardships they endured to fight for justice. [JTA]

Last week, it was announced that a new edition of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn that replaces the “n-word” with “slave” would hit shelves next month. In response, Marjorie Ingall took to her column to discuss the challenges of talking to your children about racial slurs. [Tablet Magazine]

Lilith contributor, Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg, criticized NY Jewish Week writer Jonathan Mark today for his comparison of Debbie Friedman’s sexuality to the sexual misconduct committed Shlomo Carlebach. [Jewschool]

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